here

message   caligula would be ashamed

130186:

Dolce & Gabbana S/S 2014

130186:

Dolce & Gabbana S/S 2014

(via oh-kkeapsong)

— 21 hours ago with 16611 notes

Shichi-Go-San (七五三) or “Seven- Five Three” is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for girls (ages 3 & 7) and boys (ages 3 & 5), held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children. 

The ages 3, 5 and 7 are consistent with East Asian numerology, which claims that odd numbers are lucky.
Particularly, at the age of seven, a young girl celebrates wearing her first obi, while at the age of five, a young boy celebrates wearing his first hakama pants in public. The age of three marks the first time whereby both boys and girls are allowed to let their hair grow.

(Source: gn-a, via bizenghast)

— 2 days ago with 5864 notes
ancientpeoples:

String of beads with feline head amulets
18th Dynasty, New Kingdom
c.1550-1425 BC
The use of feline’s-head ornaments in jewelry is well known from the Twelfth Dynasty (ca. 1981-1802 B.C.) and continues in the early Eighteenth Dynasty. It is difficult to identify the type of cat that the Egyptians had in mind, although most seem to be leopards, an animal that, in the Middle Kingdom, has apotropaic properties.
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

String of beads with feline head amulets

18th Dynasty, New Kingdom

c.1550-1425 BC

The use of feline’s-head ornaments in jewelry is well known from the Twelfth Dynasty (ca. 1981-1802 B.C.) and continues in the early Eighteenth Dynasty. It is difficult to identify the type of cat that the Egyptians had in mind, although most seem to be leopards, an animal that, in the Middle Kingdom, has apotropaic properties.

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

— 1 week ago with 279 notes
#pajari 

Carrie Mae Weems: “I looked and looked to see what so terrified you,” from her installation Louisiana Project, 2006

Carrie Mae Weems: “I looked and looked to see what so terrified you,” from her installation Louisiana Project, 2006

(Source: 3of5, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

— 1 week ago with 109 notes

arctictic:

Shoes at Marc by Marc Jacobs Spring 2015 NYFW

— 1 week ago with 19581 notes

arctictic:

Marc by Marc Jacobs Spring 2015 NYFW

— 1 week ago with 16 notes
omgthatdress:

Ensemble
Anne Klein, 1968
The Philadelphia Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Ensemble

Anne Klein, 1968

The Philadelphia Museum of Art

— 1 week ago with 363 notes
#ilse 

jacobpieeater:

sixpenceee:

If you rub your closed eyes, you’ll “see” a virtual rainbow of colors, shapes, squiggles, and lines. Those are called phosphenes, and the eye and the brain work together to create these weird little visual blips.

Phosphenes occur when there is no external visual stimulus. That can happen when you close your eyes or when you’re focused on scenery with little to no input as to depth or changes, such as a dark highway at night.

People who spend long periods of time in sensory deprivation or meditation often report seeing visions, which can be chalked up to the appearance of phosphenes.

The presence of physical stimulus to the eye, like pushing on the eyeball, will create temporary phosphenes, and more traumatic events like head injuries can create permanent squiggles.

 In these cases, phosphenes are present because the visual centers of the brain are active without the presence of external visual stimuli.

For example, when conscious patients undergoing brain surgery had different areas of their brains electrically stimulated, they reported seeing phosophenes.

In studies of blind people, it’s been found that the appearance of phosphenes happens in different areas along the sight pathway between the eye and the brain, depending on what part of the visual system has been damaged.

Humans aren’t the only ones who can see these dancing bits of light and color—the phenomenon has been observed in animals as well.

SOURCE

SO THATS WHY I SEE LITTLE SQUIGGLE LINES ALL THE TIME. SCIENCE!

(via hinekosama)

— 2 weeks ago with 8941 notes

thisisnotjapan:

1. クリムセ / KURIMSE [弓の舞 /Dance of the Bow]
2. イフンケ / IHUNKE [子守唄 / Lullaby]
3. トンコリ / TONKORI [五弦琴 / Traditional Ainu Five Stringed Plucked Instrument]
4. ムックリ / MUKKURI [口琴 / Traditional Ainu Instrument or “Jew’s Harp”] 
5. ピリカの歌 / PIRKA SONG [アイヌの歌 / Ainu Song] 
6. イオマンテリムセ / IYOMANTE RIMSE [熊の霊送りの踊り / Bear Sending Ceremony Ritual Dance] 
END

許可を得て、北海道白老町アイヌ民族博物館 ポロトコタンにて2012年8月25日に撮影しました。| Filmed with permission at the AINU MUSEUM POROTO KOTAN in Shiraoi-cho, Hokkaido on Saturday, 25th of August, 2012. 
Museum Link: www.ainu-museum.or.jp

— 2 weeks ago with 87 notes

bedpartymakeover:

25 year old Chen Yen-hui recreates makeup looks from the Tang dynasty

People gotta signal boost the fuck out of this because you know it won’t get the attention it deserves till a white person copies it

(Source: 70s-postmiserablisms, via hoseok-jinmydick)

— 2 weeks ago with 114003 notes

dynamicafrica:

For many African communities, markets still play a pivotal role in our daily lives. Markets are not only a center of activity - from bustle to hustle - but are a place for people to shop, socialize and have stimulating interactions. Located in the country’s capital city, Mozambique’s Xipamanine market is one such place.

Let lovely ladies at Nzualo Na’ Khumalo introduce to a place that’s much more than the negative search results it gets.

If you Google the word “Xipamanine” a lot of references might be thrown at you. Some words will pop right up: “Crowded”, “ disorganized”, “cluttered”, “filthy”, etc.

"Don’t let it fool you, Xipamanine is unique business center.  Like most informal markets, it is a world of its own. It is famous for its supersize, but in our opinion it is all the noise and excentric organization that make it unique.

People scream, dance, yell, do anything to get your attention. They’re here to sell. You’re there to buy. Here you can purchase anything from clothing, to construction material, school supplies, food, traditional medicine and even live animals like goats.

The people here are brave. This is people who weren’t afraid to take the little they had to build an empire. People who dared to put themselves out there. People who took the shot.

From mothers to grandfathers, everyone here is striving for something better.

People just like us. That’s why it made sense for us to go there, to trace our inspiration and bring that piece of our soul into Back to the roots.

This is where our grandparents and parents purchased their goods before the existence of Shopping malls with defined infrastructures. It is also where young folks like us come to buy the latest fashion or food to feed their families.

We wanted to showcase in a more honest way the unique feeling and vibe of the market. Our pictures are not edited, for this reason.

We wanted to bring the rawness of its beauty; the texture of its environment; the loudness of people and animals.

FEEL IT, SEE IT, SMEEL IT!!!

This is Xipamanine!”

— 2 weeks ago with 3807 notes